Hobbs of Barossa Ranges Gregor Shiraz 2005

Barossa Valley
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£44.95 per bottle
22 in stock

96 Points - Jay Miller (erobertparker.com)

The 2005 Gregor Shiraz was made from grapes dried on racks prior to crushing and fermentation in the style of Amarone. More deeply colored than its siblings, it has a liqueur, port-like character to its aromas and flavors. Large in scale and richly fruity, it conceals enough ripe tannin to evolve for 6-8 years. Drink this singular effort from 2015 to 2035.

Taste & Aroma

Score:96

The 2005 Gregor Shiraz was made from grapes dried on racks prior to crushing and fermentation in the style of Amarone. More deeply colored than its siblings, it has a liqueur, port-like character to its aromas and flavors. Large in scale and richly fruity, it conceals enough ripe tannin to evolve for 6-8 years. Drink this singular effort from 2015 to 2035.

Jay Miller

Producer

Hobbs Vintners, Angaston, South Australia

 

"The influences that Chris and Pete have had on the Hobbs wines is clear to see, the sheer level of concentration and power in the 1905 Shiraz is akin to Chris Ringland’s own wines, his signature clearly evident in the wine."

 

The historic vineyard located in the idyllic, rugged surroundings of the Barossa Ranges was planted at the beginning of the last century and is home to some of Barossa’s oldest vines. Now owned by Greg and Alison who, in 1995 left their life in the city to move their family Sean, Bridget and Jessica to start a new life among the vines.

With a strong belief in organic and biodynamic practices, Greg and Alison have managed to bring renewed vitality to these ancient vines by carefully and painstakingly hand pruning and removing dead wood from the vines to re-establish their original shape, helping the vines to continue to prosper. The unique soil and cooler climate in the Barossa Ranges allow the vines to be ‘dry-grown’, only watering in extreme conditions to maintain the health of the plant. The soil is coarse, yellow, podzolic soil on top of clay subsoil, mixed with decomposing rock which has ideal water retention allowing for this practice. This results in extremely low yields of highly concentrated grapes, the cooler climate helping to preserve essential acidity, a combination that produces wines of great power and intensity.

Greg and Alison collaborate with their neighbour, winemaker Chris Ringland to produce their 1905 Shiraz, produced from the vineyards original vines planted over a century ago. For their Gregor Shiraz, an Amarone style wine produced from hand-picked, semi dried grapes and their Tin Lids, a Shiraz-Cabernet blend the have worked for the past 10 years alongside Pete Schell of Spinifex. These flagship wines are made from extremely low yielding vines in miniscule quantities of just 130 to 300 cases.

Greg and Alison’s relationship with the winemakers they collaborate with is key, their influences showing throughout their wines. Chris Ringland is not only a colleague but a neighbour and close friend, his pedigree has gained him a reputation as Australia’s most iconic winemakers, his own wines selling for hundreds of pounds a bottle, a true testament to his skill as a winemaker and the possibilities of the Barossa Ranges terroir. We sell his Hoffman Vineyard Shiraz 2010 for a mere £274 a bottle!

The influences that Chris and Pete have had on the Hobbs wines is clear to see, the sheer level of concentration and power in the 1905 Shiraz is akin to Chris Ringland’s own wines, his signature clearly evident in the wine.

“Our philosophy in making our wines is simple; nurture the vines and concentrate on preserving the complex balance of flavours and acids as the grapes mature. The secrets of soil and seasons bring so much to the wines we make. Hand pruned, handpicked and hand made.”

Greg and Alison The influences that Chris and Pete have had on the Hobbs wines is clear to see, the sheer level of concentration and power in the 1905 Shiraz is akin to Chris Ringland’s own wines, his signature clearly evident in the wine.

Region

Barossa Valley Wines

 

A land of rolling hills and ancient vines, in the heart of South Australia, Barossa is arguably Australia’s most recognised wine region, but has not been without its ups and downs.

 

Barossa’s story began in the mid 1800s when a group of Silesian Lutherans, fleeing religious persecution, settled in the region and began working the land of Barossa’s largest land owner George Fife Angas. The settlers took to growing fruit and due to the climate in the region, grapes were most ideally suited and toward the end of the 1800s, several wineries had been established. Distinctly Germanic names such a Johann Henschke, Oscar Seppelt of Seppeltsfield and Kaesler that are leading names in the Barossa wine industry today are evidence of these early pioneers, and many are continuing today through several generations of the same family.

The wines were originally produced for religious and home use but it didn’t take long before they were being made commercially and by the start of the 20th Century wine was being exported back to England. The demand for fortified wine was huge and this coupled with the long journey on water, fortified wines dominated Barossa’s wine market right up until the end of the 1960s, but this would lead to a crisis that would set the industry into decline. As demand for fortified wines dried up, many growers were left unprofitable and the South Australian Government introduced the vine pull scheme, uprooting many of Barossa’s ancient vines during the 1980s. It took the efforts of some of the regions new faces of the time to bring the industry back by paying the growers above market value for their grapes, and saving the old vines that have become a hallmark of Barossa wine.

It is Barossa’s ancient vines that have shaped the region's style and reputation and the forward thinking attitude of the region's producers is one that is only beginning to filter through to the rest of the wine world. The winemakers of the 1980s helped to revive Barossa’s heritage, paving the way for the next generation of Barossa winemakers and this balance between heritage and progression has continued with an unparalleled energy through the region's newest and brightest stars of the 21st Century.

Explore the Barossa - Read more

Glassware

Glassware

Zalto Denk-Art Universal Glass

For richer, oaked Sauvignon Blancs such as The Fuder, white Graves or Semillon/Sauvignon blends. For young and non-vintage Champagne we recommend Zalto Universal. However, the Zalto Universal is a very good all-rounder, designed for all types of wines but may not maximize the potential of certain wine as much as the Bordeaux or Burgundy glass.

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