Hutton Vale Farm Riesling 2017

Barossa Valley
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£17.95 per bottle
390 in stock
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**Available for delivery September 2019**

Exclusive to The Vinorium

95 Points - James Halliday "If you ever want to show someone just how glorious the riesling grape can be, serve them a glass of this. It's agenda-free riesling, fundamentally delicious, intense with flavour but not cutting, gorgeous at every turn, cellarworthy if you so desire but in no way is patience a prerequisite. Lime, orange blossom, a gently candied aspect, a slip of pure lemon. It's bold and it's beautiful."

93 Points - Campbell Mattinson (The Wine Front) "It’s about as delicious as they come. It’s riper and fuller than you might expect, even slightly sweeter, the latter in a generally dry context. There’s a candied apple and orange character but there’s also an electric burst of pure lemon and pure lime, even a flash of talc. It gives the finish a good run for its money but there’s so much up-front that you’re diving in for more even before you’ve swallowed."

Winemaker - "Colin Angas was quick to realise the potential for the EdenValley to be an exceptional region for Riesling and planted a vineyard on a gentle slope in the 1960’s. Whilst considered a single vineyard, there are two distinct sections. The top section planted on the leanest soils and more exposed to the wind produces very tightly structured fruit with crisp, vibrant acidity. The bottom section, on deeper, more vigorous red soils produces plumper bunches of fruit that showcases more fresh aromatics and citrus zing. 

The 2017 Eden Valley vintage was a regarded as a knock out for producing high quality fruit and cellar worthy Riesling. At Hutton Vale Farm, renowned for some of the lowest yielding vineyards in the district, they experienced yields in line with the long term average thanks to a mild spring and minimal summer rain.

The Rieslings from Hutton Vale Farm are always beautiful wines and they strive to showcase plenty of varietal character and texture on the palate. “There is a vibrant lemon zest and lime cordial intermingled with mineral notes on the nose. On the palate, there’s fresh lemon and lime, refreshing acidity and a long textured chalky dry finish.”

Taste & Aroma

95 Points - James Halliday "If you ever want to show someone just how glorious the riesling grape can be, serve them a glass of this. It's agenda-free riesling, fundamentally delicious, intense with flavour but not cutting, gorgeous at every turn, cellarworthy if you so desire but in no way is patience a prerequisite. Lime, orange blossom, a gently candied aspect, a slip of pure lemon. It's bold and it's beautiful."

Glassware

Glassware

Zalto Denk-Art Universal Glass

For richer, oaked Sauvignon Blancs such as The Fuder, white Graves or Semillon/Sauvignon blends. For young and non-vintage Champagne we recommend Zalto Universal. However, the Zalto Universal is a very good all-rounder, designed for all types of wines but may not maximize the potential of certain wine as much as the Bordeaux or Burgundy glass.

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Hutton Vale Farm

Producer

Hutton Vale Farm Wines Online

 

We are thrilled to introduce our latest partnership with one of Eden Valley’s most historic producers. Hutton Vale Farm were put in touch with us by Craig Stansborough of After Five Wine Co who felt that “we would make a good fit”. Owned by the Angas family, Hutton Vale Farm has an incredible story with an ancestry steeped in Australian history dating back to George Fife Angas who founded South Australia. However it was the mention of the Mount Edelstone vineyard, one of the most famous and revered sites in Australia, which is now owned by Henschke that caught our attention.

It was Ronald Angas, (the Great-Grandfather) who originally planted the great Mount Edelstone vineyard in 1912 and unusually for the time, planted 100% Shiraz. Ronald managed the vineyard and began selling the fruit to the Henschke family until they eventually sold it to Henschke in the 1970s. During the 1960s Ronald had taken cuttings from the Mount Edelstone vineyard and planted the Hatton Vale Farm vineyard just one kilometre north. At the same time, he planted single vineyard blocks of Riesling and Grenache which were followed by a further block of Shiraz (from the same root stock) and a single block of Cabernet Sauvignon during the 1990s.

The first vintage was in 1987 with John Duval, the Penfolds Grange winemaker at the time who was also a family friend, who had promised to show the family how good the fruit was. The wines are now produced by Kym Teusner of Teusner wines who first became familiar and developed an ambition to work with the Hutton Vale fruit whilst at Torbreck.

The vineyard contains some of the most sought after fruit in the region, the sheer quality of this fruit continuously confirmed by some of Barossa’s best producers who source grapes from the Hutton Vale Farm vineyard for their flagship wines. Wolf Blass platinum had previously won the title of world’s best Shiraz using fruit from the Hutton Vale vineyard which is an incredible statement to be able to make. But perhaps even more impressive to us was to learn that Dan Standish also used Hutton Vale grapes for his 99 point scoring Lamella, the wine that we had sold out of before it even docked in the UK!

In conversation with Stuart Angus from Hutton Vale Farm - Read more

 

Region

Barossa Valley Wines

 

A land of rolling hills and ancient vines, in the heart of South Australia, Barossa is arguably Australia’s most recognised wine region, but has not been without its ups and downs.

 

Barossa’s story began in the mid 1800s when a group of Silesian Lutherans, fleeing religious persecution, settled in the region and began working the land of Barossa’s largest land owner George Fife Angas. The settlers took to growing fruit and due to the climate in the region, grapes were most ideally suited and toward the end of the 1800s, several wineries had been established. Distinctly Germanic names such a Johann Henschke, Oscar Seppelt of Seppeltsfield and Kaesler that are leading names in the Barossa wine industry today are evidence of these early pioneers, and many are continuing today through several generations of the same family.

The wines were originally produced for religious and home use but it didn’t take long before they were being made commercially and by the start of the 20th Century wine was being exported back to England. The demand for fortified wine was huge and this coupled with the long journey on water, fortified wines dominated Barossa’s wine market right up until the end of the 1960s, but this would lead to a crisis that would set the industry into decline. As demand for fortified wines dried up, many growers were left unprofitable and the South Australian Government introduced the vine pull scheme, uprooting many of Barossa’s ancient vines during the 1980s. It took the efforts of some of the regions new faces of the time to bring the industry back by paying the growers above market value for their grapes, and saving the old vines that have become a hallmark of Barossa wine.

It is Barossa’s ancient vines that have shaped the region's style and reputation and the forward thinking attitude of the region's producers is one that is only beginning to filter through to the rest of the wine world. The winemakers of the 1980s helped to revive Barossa’s heritage, paving the way for the next generation of Barossa winemakers and this balance between heritage and progression has continued with an unparalleled energy through the region's newest and brightest stars of the 21st Century.

The Barossa Valley is warm and dry with low rainfall and low humidity, which can lead to a risk of drought during the growing season. It’s lower in altitude and is typified by gentle, rolling hills and valleys and is home to some of the world’s oldest clusters of vines, some of which are over 125 years old. These old vines are very low yielding and produce exceptionally concentrated fruit which is exploited by producers like Greenock Creek, Hobbs and Standish to make very rich and powerful wines that due to their concentration, often reach high levels of alcohol. Although several varieties are grown across Barossa, by far the most widely planted is Shiraz, producing rich, fruit forward wines. In the past, Barossa’s reputation has suffered from this rich style of wine, with consumers and producers favouring wines from cooler areas of Australia. However, a wave of smaller, artisan wineries began to pop up during the 1980’s and 1990’s and brought a resurgence to this region with trailblazers like Torbreck and St Hallett.

Explore the Barossa - Read more

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