Powell & Son Roussanne Marsanne 2017

Barossa Valley
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£40.95 per bottle
141 in stock

97+ Points Stuart McCloskey "Sharply focused, linear with a vibrancy which I wasn’t expecting. The floral character comes to the fore which compliments the nashi pear, peach, melon and suggestion of jasmine brilliantly. The palate is expansive with swathes of buttered citrus fruits underpinned with a core of minerals. I’ll be brutally honest, I was expecting a voluptuous Barossa bombshell. Instead, I received an unexpected balancing act between litheness and precision which is extremely impressive. This is one of those rare wines which floats on the palate but delivers to every millimetre.  Drinking beautifully now (decant for 20 mins) but will cellar for 8-10 years."  

Mike Bennie, The Wine Front  "The past saw Marsanne in some new oak, the Roussanne not, and the wine a feat of blending rather than co-fermenting. Layering in the detail. The total new oak is 20% but you’d hardly know aside some textural elements that might trigger something in you. It feels like a fine wine from the get-go, is the other message. Slippery texture, a touch of grass with cool melon and ripe apple scents and flavours the mainstays. It shows sniffs and licks of nougat-halva too, a well-rolled-in seasoning of oak and lees time. Length is excellent, the wine feels like it stains the palate but finds some velocity to tighten up and go lightly-nutty-bitter to close, way-way away. Medium weight white of high interest and drinkability, is the takeaway."

Taste & Aroma

97+ Points Stuart McCloskey "Sharply focused, linear with a vibrancy which I wasn’t expecting. The floral character comes to the fore which compliments the nashi pear, peach, melon and suggestion of jasmine brilliantly. The palate is expansive with swathes of buttered citrus fruits underpinned with a core of minerals. I’ll be brutally honest, I was expecting a voluptuous Barossa bombshell. Instead, I received an unexpected balancing act between litheness and precision which is extremely impressive. This is one of those rare wines which floats on the palate but delivers to every millimetre.  Drinking beautifully now (decant for 20 mins) but will cellar for 8-10 years."  

Mike Bennie, The Wine Front  "The past saw Marsanne in some new oak, the Roussanne not, and the wine a feat of blending rather than co-fermenting. Layering in the detail. The total new oak is 20% but you’d hardly know aside some textural elements that might trigger something in you. It feels like a fine wine from the get-go, is the other message. Slippery texture, a touch of grass with cool melon and ripe apple scents and flavours the mainstays. It shows sniffs and licks of nougat-halva too, a well-rolled-in seasoning of oak and lees time. Length is excellent, the wine feels like it stains the palate but finds some velocity to tighten up and go lightly-nutty-bitter to close, way-way away. Medium weight white of high interest and drinkability, is the takeaway."

Glassware

Glassware

Zalto Denk-Art Universal Glass

Zalto Universal Glass is recommended for richer, oaked Sauvignon Blancs such as The Fuder, white Graves or Semillon/Sauvignon blends as well as young and non-vintage Champagne. The Zalto Universal is a very good all-rounder, designed for all types of wines but may not maximize the potential of certain wine as much as the Bordeaux or Burgundy glass.

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Producer

David Powell was the founder and MD for Torbreck Vintners since its inception in 1994 until his sudden departure back in August 2013. Dave returned in 2014, this time with son Callum as Powell & Son. Many of you share our enthusiasm for Torbreck wines which are carefully skilled and perfectly judged. The same can be said for Dave and Callum’s new wines however, their pricing policy will keep the vast majority from our cellar's doors as prices are stratospherically high - £6,000 for a dozen bottles of their 99-point Kraehe Shiraz!

Nevertheless, we have purchased the UK allocation (only 150 bottles) of one wine, their sensational Roussanne / Marsanne blend which the father and son team based on the style of the great Hermitage Blancs of the Northern Rhone. They aim for richness, minerality and hedonism however, and pleasingly, the latter goal is more subdued which sets their wine apart from many. The style is typically lower in acid and high in phenolic content, which provides richness on the palate and requisite phenolics to age.

The Roussanne component is fermented and aged in stainless steel to maintain acidity and fruit florals whilst the Marsanne is barrel fermented in half new French oak. It is lees stirred, undergoes malolactic fermentation and is matured in French oak. Aside from a minor bentonite fining, no fining or filtration is done to maintain the phenolic richness of the two varieties. They are blended together prior to bottling: the Roussanne providing the aromatic fruit profile and acid balance and the Marsanne adding palate structure and richness.

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Region

Barossa Valley Wines

 

A land of rolling hills and ancient vines, in the heart of South Australia, Barossa is arguably Australia’s most recognised wine region, but has not been without its ups and downs.

 

Barossa’s story began in the mid 1800s when a group of Silesian Lutherans, fleeing religious persecution, settled in the region and began working the land of Barossa’s largest land owner George Fife Angas. The settlers took to growing fruit and due to the climate in the region, grapes were most ideally suited and toward the end of the 1800s, several wineries had been established. Distinctly Germanic names such a Johann Henschke, Oscar Seppelt of Seppeltsfield and Kaesler that are leading names in the Barossa wine industry today are evidence of these early pioneers, and many are continuing today through several generations of the same family.

The wines were originally produced for religious and home use but it didn’t take long before they were being made commercially and by the start of the 20th Century wine was being exported back to England. The demand for fortified wine was huge and this coupled with the long journey on water, fortified wines dominated Barossa’s wine market right up until the end of the 1960s, but this would lead to a crisis that would set the industry into decline. As demand for fortified wines dried up, many growers were left unprofitable and the South Australian Government introduced the vine pull scheme, uprooting many of Barossa’s ancient vines during the 1980s. It took the efforts of some of the regions new faces of the time to bring the industry back by paying the growers above market value for their grapes, and saving the old vines that have become a hallmark of Barossa wine.

It is Barossa’s ancient vines that have shaped the region's style and reputation and the forward thinking attitude of the region's producers is one that is only beginning to filter through to the rest of the wine world. The winemakers of the 1980s helped to revive Barossa’s heritage, paving the way for the next generation of Barossa winemakers and this balance between heritage and progression has continued with an unparalleled energy through the region's newest and brightest stars of the 21st Century.

The Barossa Valley is warm and dry with low rainfall and low humidity, which can lead to a risk of drought during the growing season. It’s lower in altitude and is typified by gentle, rolling hills and valleys and is home to some of the world’s oldest clusters of vines, some of which are over 125 years old. These old vines are very low yielding and produce exceptionally concentrated fruit which is exploited by producers like Greenock Creek, Hobbs and Standish to make very rich and powerful wines that due to their concentration, often reach high levels of alcohol. Although several varieties are grown across Barossa, by far the most widely planted is Shiraz, producing rich, fruit forward wines. In the past, Barossa’s reputation has suffered from this rich style of wine, with consumers and producers favouring wines from cooler areas of Australia. However, a wave of smaller, artisan wineries began to pop up during the 1980’s and 1990’s and brought a resurgence to this region with trailblazers like Torbreck and St Hallett.

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