Topper's Mountain Bricolage Rouge 2014

Barossa Valley
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£24.95 per bottle
158 in stock

96++ - 97 Points - Stuart McCloskey "The blend changes with each passing vintage. The ’14 includes Tempranillo, Nebbiolo, Tanat, Shiraz and Viognier. The perfume is brooding and laced with fauna and flora complimented with ribbons of dark, ripe red fruits (Very much reminds me of red fruits found in high quality, bitter chocolate). The palate is incredibly fine, the tannins silken, the structural element wonderfully feminine. All-in-all, exquisitely balanced, refined and full of charm. The rose hip / petal, wild mint and liquorice combination is a joy to taste. Profound it is not, but I am truly smitten by its overall charisma. This would be wonderful if paired with rare loin of venison served with a sweet berry and juniper sauce. En pointe now and will keep for a few more years, but this is one to be enjoyed sooner rather than later… We sampled using Zalto’s Universal glassware."

Winemaker “Bricolage Rouge is a traditional Topper’s Mountain red blend. It’s assemblage varies every vintage because we always put together our best performers of the vintage.

The 2014 release is an exciting blend of Tempranillo, Nebbiolo, Tannat and Shiraz Viognier. Aromas of raspberries, forest strawberries, cherries, liquorice, hint of mint and pine tree. Savoury, balanced and elegant on the palate with flavours of forest strawberries, cassis, ripe raspberries & a touch of toast and chocolate. Long and focused peppery finish. Is it the best one so far? I wouldn’t mind this one slightly chilled (approx. 15 C) with prosciutto and other cured meat or some great homemade BBQ sausages.”

Huon Hooke, The Real Review, Oct 2018 "Medium to full red colour with a bare minimum of purple. The bouquet is a mixture of raspberry and fresh mint, stalks and berries. A curious wine, well outside the mainstream, and possessing a lot of charm. The sweetly-scented nose is captivating; the palate fruit-sweet, light-bodied, low tannin and delicious in what seems like a whole-bunchy style. Serve in a large glass to fully appreciate the layers."

Taste & Aroma

96++ - 97 Points - Stuart McCloskey "The blend changes with each passing vintage. The ’14 includes Tempranillo, Nebbiolo, Tanat, Shiraz and Viognier. The perfume is brooding and laced with fauna and flora complimented with ribbons of dark, ripe red fruits (Very much reminds me of red fruits found in high quality, bitter chocolate). The palate is incredibly fine, the tannins silken, the structural element wonderfully feminine. All-in-all, exquisitely balanced, refined and full of charm. The rose hip / petal, wild mint and liquorice combination is a joy to taste. Profound it is not, but I am truly smitten by its overall charisma. This would be wonderful if paired with rare loin of venison served with a sweet berry and juniper sauce. En pointe now and will keep for a few more years, but this is one to be enjoyed sooner rather than later… We sampled using Zalto’s Universal glassware."

Winemaker Notes: An exciting blend of Tempranillo, Nebbiolo, Tannat and Shiraz Viognier. Aromas of raspberries, forest strawberries, cherries, liquorice, hint of mint and pine tree. Savoury, balanced and elegant on the palate with flavours of forest strawberries, cassis, ripe raspberries & a touch of toast and chocolate. Long and focused peppery finish. Is it the best one so far?
I wouldn’t mind this one slightly chilled (approx. 15 C) with prosciutto and other cured meat or some great homemade BBQ sausages.

Glassware

Glassware

Zalto Denk-Art Bordeaux Glass

The Zalto Bordeaux glass is recommended for weightier style reds, probably our most widely used glass when tasting in house, this glass is great for many different wines. The large bowl helping aerate and soften tannins whilst accentuating the wine's depth and concentration. The Bordeaux glass is the ideal choice for Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Zinfandel, Bordeaux or Rhône style blends and many other red wines. Surprisingly, it is also the glass of choice for oaked Chardonnay, the shape of the bowl accentuating the balance of ripe fruits and oak.

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Topper's Mountain

Producer

Topper's Mountain wines

New England is unlike any other wine producing region in Australia. In a country which NASA declared ‘the flattest in the world’ we find a wine producing region situated at over 1000m above sea level, putting them at a similar altitude to the peak of Mount Snowdon! This provides a cool climate, with soils and topography which work perfectly for the mostly Mediterranean grape varieties that the team at Topper’s Mountain focus on growing here.

Topper’s Mountain is our first, exclusive winery from New England which is an exciting, re-emerging wine region with a captivating history dating back as far as the first settlers, who began planting vineyards and making wine there due to the difficulties in transporting alcohol from other major centres.

The Topper’s vineyard was founded in by Mark Kirkby 1998 and sits at 900m ASL, meaning that despite sitting much closer to the equator than most of the world’s viticulture, they are still bestowed with cool nights, low maximum temperatures and a generally continental climate. These all combine to create wines of great elegance and fruit definition which are more comparable to wines grown a thousand kilometres or more from the equator. Winemaker, Mike Hayes says, “My philosophy is to express the terroir of the vineyard and not the barrel maker from the south of France. I feel that great wine comes from great vineyards, not great winemakers. I also feel that to capture the flavour of the earth and express it in the bottle is a far greater challenge than manufacturing wine in the lab.”

Vigneron and owner Mark Kirkby and manager Jan Toborsky provide a fascinating insight into life and winemaking at Topper’s Mountain in our introductory conversation which you can read here.

Region

Barossa Valley Wines

 

A land of rolling hills and ancient vines, in the heart of South Australia, Barossa is arguably Australia’s most recognised wine region, but has not been without its ups and downs.

 

Barossa’s story began in the mid 1800s when a group of Silesian Lutherans, fleeing religious persecution, settled in the region and began working the land of Barossa’s largest land owner George Fife Angas. The settlers took to growing fruit and due to the climate in the region, grapes were most ideally suited and toward the end of the 1800s, several wineries had been established. Distinctly Germanic names such a Johann Henschke, Oscar Seppelt of Seppeltsfield and Kaesler that are leading names in the Barossa wine industry today are evidence of these early pioneers, and many are continuing today through several generations of the same family.

The wines were originally produced for religious and home use but it didn’t take long before they were being made commercially and by the start of the 20th Century wine was being exported back to England. The demand for fortified wine was huge and this coupled with the long journey on water, fortified wines dominated Barossa’s wine market right up until the end of the 1960s, but this would lead to a crisis that would set the industry into decline. As demand for fortified wines dried up, many growers were left unprofitable and the South Australian Government introduced the vine pull scheme, uprooting many of Barossa’s ancient vines during the 1980s. It took the efforts of some of the regions new faces of the time to bring the industry back by paying the growers above market value for their grapes, and saving the old vines that have become a hallmark of Barossa wine.

It is Barossa’s ancient vines that have shaped the region's style and reputation and the forward thinking attitude of the region's producers is one that is only beginning to filter through to the rest of the wine world. The winemakers of the 1980s helped to revive Barossa’s heritage, paving the way for the next generation of Barossa winemakers and this balance between heritage and progression has continued with an unparalleled energy through the region's newest and brightest stars of the 21st Century.

The Barossa Valley is warm and dry with low rainfall and low humidity, which can lead to a risk of drought during the growing season. It’s lower in altitude and is typified by gentle, rolling hills and valleys and is home to some of the world’s oldest clusters of vines, some of which are over 125 years old. These old vines are very low yielding and produce exceptionally concentrated fruit which is exploited by producers like Greenock Creek, Hobbs and Standish to make very rich and powerful wines that due to their concentration, often reach high levels of alcohol. Although several varieties are grown across Barossa, by far the most widely planted is Shiraz, producing rich, fruit forward wines. In the past, Barossa’s reputation has suffered from this rich style of wine, with consumers and producers favouring wines from cooler areas of Australia. However, a wave of smaller, artisan wineries began to pop up during the 1980’s and 1990’s and brought a resurgence to this region.

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